The Tears of a Clown

Now if there's a smile upon my face…

The Twenty Truths of Losing Your Partner to Suicide

1. You find that you talk to yourself in the absence of your partner. You wander around the house asking her questions. There are no answers.

2. You have upsetting images that flashback into your mind of when you had to identify your partner at the hospital. The images destroy you. You wonder if the sight of your breathless partner will ever leave you, to be replaced by the smiling image you remember.

3. You find yourself constantly asking yourself the questions ‘What if I could have done something?’ and ‘Why did you do this to yourself/me/your children?’

4. You feel so low at first that simple everyday things like keeping yourself clean seem like a huge task.

5. There are many times when you feel like taking your own life, so impossible do things seem. You consider different methods of doing this.

red rose

6. Eating becomes something to just survive. You don’t want to spend any time preparing proper food and you take solace in junk food. The microwave is your salvation.

7. Many of your long time neighbours avoid you. They push their children into the house when they see you walking up the road so that they can avoid talking to you because it’s ‘awkward’.

8. You wonder how you are going to be able to manage at work, ever, any more.

9. You cry when you least expect it, frequently. Even after a period of time when you think you’re ‘getting over it’ the tears squeeze out of your eyes unexpectedly when you have certain thoughts or are reminded of her in some unexpected way. You even cry at the nice things people say to you.

10. You find it difficult to listen to music because you associate the lyrics with you and your lost partner. The chords feel like a soundtrack to your broken life.

11. Even though you have friends and family you often feel so lonely, especially when you’re going back to that empty house once more. You can go a whole weekend barely speaking to anybody. You feel slightly powerless to do anything about this.

12. Anxiety is your normal state, you find yourself panicking about most things, often without specific reason.

13. Your life becomes narrow. Those country walks are no more, the meals out, the cinema. Holidays appear to be a thing that you used to do.

14. You become fatalistic about life and wonder if this is now all there is for you? That the game is over? You’re on your own until the lights finally go out.

15. You keep trying. You go to work on time, do your chores at home wherever possible, shop for food, tackle that garden as best you can. It all feels rather pointless. It isn’t for anybody else’s sake and you don’t care about yourself.

16. Your finances are in shock mode as you gain unexpected expenses whilst at the same time losing a household income.

17. You believe that you are not going to get through this ordeal. This feeling is revisited every day. Day after day.

18. Her clothing and possessions have to be sorted. This task feels heartless – like you are throwing your memories of being together away. Like you don’t care, but you do.

19. You begin to look at the people you know differently. Almost subconsciously you practise zero tolerance with people you feel have wronged you or ignored you at your time of need. Good people come to the fore, the genuine friends prove themselves time over. One or two new people enter your life, show caring and give you some hope.

20. You write a piece  like this but don’t know exactly why. You’re almost beyond caring if anybody reads it. You could write twenty more.

May 18, 2014 - Posted by | Ripping Yarns | ,

10 Comments »

  1. Really sorry to read this Stu, you have been such an asset to the nottstalgia forum with your articulate thoughtful postings.

    Kind Regards Take Care James BurtKt

    Comment by James | May 19, 2014

  2. write 20 more and 20 more … do whatever you feel brings you comfort and release … rage against the fates if need be

    Comment by Lissette | May 19, 2014

  3. Thanks Lissette. It felt right to get it out but I’m just not sure what works any more.

    Comment by Stuart | May 19, 2014

  4. Thanks for the kind words, James. they’re appreciated.

    Comment by Stuart | May 19, 2014

  5. Oh there is no right or wrong in this process Stuart … just hold on and do whatever helps you through.

    Comment by Lissette | May 21, 2014

  6. Thanks for your understanding and kind words, Lissette.

    Comment by Stuart | May 21, 2014

  7. I lost my first wife back in the 80’s,and I wanted my world to end.No one could help me in my grief,it was all to personal,and I felt people were an intrusion.
    I seldom talk about this time in my life,but I can understand much of what is happening to you and trying to cope with the everyday living.
    It will get easier Stu,and you will listen to the music,it will have a stronger meaning and you will begin to see the beauty again.Denice and I send you our prayers and love,your friend, Bryan

    Comment by Bryan Murray | August 8, 2014

  8. Thank you for your kind messages, Bryan. I hope to get back to you tomorrow, In the meantime, take care.

    Stu

    Comment by Stuart | August 8, 2014

  9. Wrapping you in love. x

    Comment by Jane Sturgeon | April 3, 2016

  10. […] The Twenty Truths of Losing Your Partner to Suicide […]

    Pingback by Focusing on Suicide Prevention « The Tears of a Clown | September 5, 2016


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