The Tears of a Clown

Now if there's a smile upon my face…

Snow Day

Well here we are. In a much more traditional winter here in the UK, snow has finally hit Nottinghamshire which is something of a rarity in itself these days. More usually there is an annual smattering of the white stuff maybe one or two days a year and little more. Sometimes I imagine I must be dreaming of times  from the past when we experienced ‘real’ snow here in the East Midlands city, so rare have those occasions been for so long now.

As I write, the UK appears to have hit a state of pandemonium regarding this sudden winter ‘event’ as the TV weather people like to term it these days. There is certainly much excitement!

It’s easy for me to say of course, Nottingham still experiences much less snow than many other parts of the UK for some reason. Televised scenes from around the country bear that out of today too but to my mind the reaction to the snow is nothing short of hysterical. This may be because I’ve experienced quite a few Canadian winters with their bitter temperatures, blizzards and huge snow banks that gather through the colder months, and the way that Canadians just deal with it. I don’t think so though. I see a big difference in our reaction to it here in the UK than times when I was younger. There is little comparison. I note from today’s news that whilst around ten Nottinghamshire schools are reportedly closed today there are around 250 closures in the Leicestershire region alone. You know in my school days I remember many days of deep snow but never do I remember my school being closed because of it, nor even sent home early.

nottm_camera_oms

A near-deserted Old Market Square, in Nottingham today. Note the .0005mm of snow covering

During a live magazine programme on TV this morning one of the co-presenters actually couldn’t make it to the studio for broadcasting duties due to the weather. What followed was a live telephone call from him and his co-presenter  proceeding to continue with the show whilst cupping a hot drink to her face like she’d just been to the Arctic Circle, not merely across London with a few inches of snow on the ground. Similarly, another live TV programme at lunchtime actually had the panel of ‘celebrities’ applauding the audience for making it to the studio! Just ludicrous!

Have we all gone so soft nowadays that we can’t put up with a little winter weather? Is it the Health and Safety laws? I’m sure both have some contribution to make. Meanwhile the local authorities appear to place their heads firmly in the sand (or should that be snow?) and hope that the problem just won’t happen. A general inadequacy in clearing the snow is often tabled at the local councils, probably because they gamble on it not happening and don’t budget enough for when it does. Another question, why are many bus services not running? I never recall this from years ago when we had much more serious falls of snow.

I actually accept the snow as part of what a winter is all about. I’m prepared to get on with things and unlikely to let it stop me doing anything much that I normally would. I don’t think that’s such an unusual stance. I actually like to see the stuff, it makes something of a change from the boring, drab grey winters we normally experience here in England! At least it offers a topic of conversation I suppose…

February 2, 2009 - Posted by | Ripping Yarns | , , ,

13 Comments »

  1. I see the photo was either before the rude words or after they had been swept away. Talking point on Radio Nottingham this morning was that someone had written something rude in the snow.

    Comment by Guzzisue | February 2, 2009

  2. Yes, I saw that Sue.

    Go to http://www.troubled-diva.com/ it’s on there today.

    Comment by Stuart | February 2, 2009

  3. LOL! We had a great time with the snow here. Of course all the schools and colleges were shut and the trains were a bit off but himself arrived home only slightly late tonight.

    I had a friend at school who was Canadian and basically thought we were a bunch of big girls blouses over here. She wondered why we didn’t just have blankets shovels and the occasional snow chain in the car.
    It seems to me that no one bothers to take a shovel with them-an obvious item-when they go driving through the snow.

    Of course gritter lorries are a rare breed as well.

    Comment by mum6kids | February 3, 2009

  4. I’m pretty jealous of you southern softies and your snow 😉 We got about five minutes of slush in Leith.

    Comment by Richard | February 5, 2009

  5. Ever seen a whole county paralised be three flakes of snow, Rich? 🙂

    We had more snow than in a while yesterday and the menfolk along our road were out shovelling the road clear, (it’s a novel idea that the local council might like to consider one of these times). It remains to be seen if in the event of more snow the neighbours come out for ‘seconds’!

    Comment by Stuart | February 6, 2009

  6. Hi Shell

    Hope the kids enjoyed their ‘snow day’! Great stuff. Maybe some more again yesterday?

    In Canada they would think this is Spring-time!

    I think I spotted a gritting lorry the other day…it was closely followed by a road-sweeper! Ah well, the grit’s running out now apparently. Oh he wonders of an English winter!

    Comment by Stuart | February 6, 2009

  7. Hi

    We live 6500ft up in the White Mountains in Arizona we had snow overnight and are expecting 8-10″ on the ground by morning.

    We moved here from Chicago and three weeks ago I was back in Chicago on Business and it was 47 below hoping for a high of zero but never made it.

    I come from Middlesbrough and remember 1947 that was bad.
    The Brits never figured out how to handle snow except to make snow balls.

    Comment by Malcolm Dixon | February 8, 2009

  8. Nice read stuart!!!!
    All the villages round me came to a stand still and college was closed for the whole week. Not once was school closed because of snow in scotland.

    You been to many Forest games lately?

    Lewis

    Comment by hibeeleicester | February 9, 2009

  9. Hi HL

    Yes I heard that Leicestershire was particularly bad with a lot of schools closed down. Bet you spent all your time off studying?! 🙂

    GGTTH

    Comment by Stuart | February 10, 2009

  10. To be fair the first few days were great going out every day but it got boring and i wanted to go back…is that wrong. Most probably.
    Like i said, The English and their snow!!! Just isnt the same for me.

    Im off to vegas for a week on thursday!! Wonder if ill get any snow there 😉

    Lewis

    GGTTH

    Comment by lewis | February 11, 2009

  11. HI Malcom

    47 below sounds a wee bit chilly. I’ve experienced something like this in Edmonton, Alberta and it really is time to stay home those days eh! I believe -60 (inc windchill) is not too rare in Ed.

    I agree with you about not dealing with snow here but I do actually think we have taken massive steps backwards in this respect. I just don’t remember this mass hysteria in days of yore!

    Comment by Stuart | February 11, 2009

  12. Hi Lewis

    Seriously, I know what you mean. The only problem with time off college is that all the work has to be pulled back in somewhere along the line doesn’t it. The other factor is that it alsways seems to be one day of reasonable snow (if that!) and then several days of slush.

    I don;t go to Forest games, mate. It’s Hibs or nothing for me I’m afraid! I go to a very occasional game with the local non-league team but any sport watching I do here in Nottingham is normally relegated to the Nottingham Panthers ice hockey team.

    Comment by Stuart | February 11, 2009

  13. Hi

    Lewis

    I will also be in Vegas next week but on business.
    I am out there on a regular basis as I am consultant with the water authority out at Lake Mead.

    In December I was trying to meet up with one of the Managers
    from the Las Vegas Water Dept. in York PA. but he failed to arrive in Baltimore as Vegas airport was snowed in and they had no snow equipment or de-icing equipment.

    So you just never know, Right!!!

    Although I have lived in the States for almost thirty years
    I keep up to speed with the UK as my children and grandkids live in Huddersfied.

    Comment by Malcolm Dixon | February 11, 2009


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: